National Pet Day!

In celebration of National Pet Day, we would love to see photos of your favorite canine or feline companion,  feathered friend, scaly creature, fishy fish, creepy crawler, or any other buddy.  And be sure to give everyone an extra treat today!

Send pics to barbara@boulderdogfoodcompany.com2cats&3dogs

Partnering with the Humane Society of Boulder Valley

 Our Featured Dog & Cat of the Month:

 

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Honey
Labrador Retriever/Coonhound
Age: 0 yr 6 mo
Sex: Female
Color: Red/White
Weight: 35 lbs
Here since: 3/9/2014
ID: 22161269
Adoption fee: $129

Honey is full of life so if you like to party, she’s your gal! She is learning to relax around other dogs with the help of our Training and Behavior team and we believe she could live in a multi-dog home with another youthful dog.  This would allow her to  use up some of inexhaustible energy! At this time, HSBV will only rehome Honey to a family with children 10 years of age or older as she is a bit impulsive and might overwhelm young children.
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Scout
Domestic Shorthair
Age: 6 years 0 mo
Sex: Female
Color: Black/White
Weight: 14 lbs
Here since: 3/9/2014
ID: 22201401
Adoption fee: $10

This lovely lady is ready to relax and de-stress. Being a long-term resident in several shelter facilities has frazzled this kitty a bit, and now she is more than ready to find her forever home, shake off her stress, and start enjoying life again! A sunny window sill, comfy couch, and two-legged friend to share her days with will have her back to her easy-going self in no time. She will fit in most families and be a wonderful companion for many years to come.  Come meet this adorable lady.

 

Book Review: CAT SENSE

CAT SENSE
How the New Feline Science Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet
by John Bradshaw
Book Review by Boulder Dog Food Company LLC
John Bradshaw, a prominent anthrozoologist at the University of Bristol, begins his book with a thorough examination of the historical relationship between humans and cats. He provides the macro view of how cats evolved from solitary predator to domesticated companion. He then addresses today’s relationship, emphasizing that cats are still essentially wild animals. Although they have coexisted with humans for thousands of years, they remain independent, predatory and suspicious of other cats as well as people. Bradshaw believes that “Cats still have three out of four paws firmly planted in the wild, and within only a few generations, can easily revert back to the independent way of life that was the exclusive preserve of their predecessors some 10,000 years ago.”

The conventional wisdom is that cats became domesticated in Egypt about 3,500 years ago. Bradshaw believes that it happened earlier, in widely separated locales - although the progeny of many of these cats didn’t necessarily remain domesticated. Cats’ teeth and bones, dating between 7,000 and 6,000 BCE, have been excavated in several Middle Eastern cities. While it might be argued that these were wild cats, not domesticated, there is ample evidence that cats were caught and transported to the island of Cyprus around the same time. The most likely reason for attempting to tame them was to control vermin. In the early days, they might have been confined to granaries and human settlements so they did not escape. Eventually, they would have become accustomed to the easy access to food and would have thrived in a warm, dry and protected environment.

With many wildcats evolving in different parts of the world, Bradshaw claims that only one was successfully domesticated, the Arabian wildcat Felis silvestris lybica. This is confirmed by the DNA of all domestic cats today, whether they are purebred or random-bred. The other subspecies, while similar in appearance, were perhaps less inclined to be tamed. According to Bradshaw, “Domestication can start only with animals that are tame enough to raise their young in the proximity of people. Those offspring that are best suited to the company of humans and human environments are, perhaps unsurprisingly, more likely to stay and breed there than those that are not; the latter will most likely revert to the wild. Over several generations, this repeated “natural” selection will, even on its own, gradually change the genetic makeup of these animals so that they become better adapted to life alongside people. It is also likely that, at the same time, humans will intensify that selection, by feeding the more docile animals and driving away those prone to bite and scratch.” 

The Egyptians had a complicated relationship with cats. Starting out as useful predators for rodents as well as snakes, cats became treasured companions and then gradually became revered for their spiritual significance. Herodotus reported that when a pet cat died from natural causes, all members of the household shaved their eyebrows as a mark of respect. Nevertheless, cats eventually became sacrificial objects as the Egyptians placed a great emphasis on the afterlife. Millions of cats, along with many other animals such as lions, dogs, cattle, birds and snakes, were mummified as offerings to the gods. Cats, however, remained the favorite offering for the afterlife and a whole industry evolved to breed cats specifically for this purpose.

Bradshaw believes that the cat’s involvement in Egyptian religion may have been important in helping cats transition from wild hunter to domestic companion. While most died for the spiritual cause, he believes that some must have escaped to the general population where their descendants would have inherited improved skills for living in an urban environment.

Three chapters are devoted to the biology of cats and how this affects their interactions with other cats as well as people. Many interesting facts are disclosed about their acute senses. Bradshaw believes that we must try to visualize their world in order to truly understand them.

Sight - Their eyes, huge for the size of their head, give them superior vision with the pupils expanding to three times more than ours in the dark. They have a remarkable ability to detect small movements through the visual cortex of the brain which processes and compares what they’re seeing sixty times each second. One drawback of having such large eyes is that they are not easy to focus.  So cats have poor close up vision and often might not see something 4-5 inches in front of their face if it’s not moving! Cats, like dogs, are also color blind to red and green.  They have two types of cones which allow them to see blue and yellow.

Hearing - Their hearing extends two octaves higher than ours which includes the ultrasonic pulses from a bat flying in the dark. In total, their hearing range is higher than any other mammal with a range of eleven octaves, enabling them to also hear the lowest notes.

Touch - Their sense of touch is magnified with many receptors on their paws as well as from the nerve endings in their claws to tell them how far their claws are extended. The skin around their whiskers is also packed with receptors so they know how far the whiskers are bent to help them during a fight or to judge the size of an opening through which they want to squeeze.
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Balance - Their excellent sense of balance comes from the vestibular system in the inner ear.  When they jump or fall, the balance organs and reflexes cause the forelegs and hind legs to rotate to extend and point downwards. At the same time, the back curves and arches in preparation for a landing. Bradshaw claims that a high fall might be less harmful than a short fall as the cat needs a second or two to assume the correct landing position and also because a cat can even form itself into a parachute by spreading all four legs out to slow their speed before adopting the landing position at the last moment!

Smell - Much more work is needed to understand how cats use their noses but Bradford believes that their olfactory skills are similar to those of dogs in many ways, including locating prey from scent marks. They also have a second olfactory apparatus called the vomeronasal organ or VNO, which functions somewhere between our senses of smell and taste.  Like lions in the wild, cats distort their faces and open their mouths slightly to engage the VNO. Scientists believe this allows them to push their saliva up into their nasopalatine canals where it is then pumped to the VNO and interpreted by the brain!

Bradford attempts to summarize their many skills and demonstrate how they all work together, ”They have quite an arsenal at their disposal: they can locate prey visually, their eyes effective in the half-light of early dawn and late dusk; aurally, detecting high-pitched squeaks and rustles; or olfactorily, through detecting the odors that rodents leave in scent marks. As they approach their prey, cats’ exquisite sense of balance and the sensory hairs on their cheeks and elbows allows them to do so silently and stealthily. As they pounce, the whiskers on their faces sweep forward to act as a short-range radar, guiding the mouth and teeth to precisely the right place to deliver the killing bite. Cats evolved as hunters, something domestication has done little to change.”

In order to truly understand cats, Bradshaw believes that humans must appreciate the cat’s relatively short period of domesticity. The “socialization period” of kittens, starting in the third week of life and progressing to eight weeks, is the most critical period to determine if a cat will become well adjusted to domesticity. Kittens need a lot of daily exposure to people during this period to form attachments to the human race and not be fearful of people. Bradshaw believes that a cat’s social brain changes at eight weeks and it becomes very difficult to alter its social inclinations afterwards. “The importance of the socialization period to a kitten’s future welfare cannot be underestimated. In just six short weeks, beginning as it turns two weeks of age, this period constructs the foundations for all its subsequent social life. If the kitten is unlucky enough to have no brothers or sisters, and has no other kittens nearby, its view of what it is to be a cat is incomplete.”

Few topics are more controversial than predation by domestic cats. While Bradshaw believes that the numbers of birds, small mammals and other animals killed by cats is wildly inflated, he does not dispute the fact that we must attempt to control the predation in order for cats to have a more assured future. He believes that, “Cats now face possibly more hostility than at any time during the last two centuries.” Although there are many theories why cats continue to hunt and kill when they are not hungry, Bradshaw thinks that too few generations have passed for their instinctive needs to have disappeared.

While training can help cats adapt to indoor living and domesticity,  Bradshaw believes there are three reasons that cats are more difficult to train than dogs:
1) Their behavior “shows less intrinsic variety than that of dogs, so there is less raw material with which to work.” Basically cats will not do something that it doesn’t consider to be natural (i.e. retrieving a ball, jumping through a hoop).
2) Cats are naturally less attentive toward humans.  Dogs are much better at observing and interpreting what humans want from them.
3) Cats appear to find less reward in physical contact from humans.  By contrast, dogs are strongly rewarded with touch and verbal praise.

According to Bradshaw, the domestication of the cat is progressing with two steps forward to each step backwards. “Genetic evolution is a much slower process than cultural evolution, and the 4,000 years over which cats have adapted to living alongside humankind is not long enough for any major change in sensory or mental abilities.”  Cats have essentially the same senses, brains and emotional responses as their wildcat ancestors. All that has changed is a new ability to form bonds with people if initiated during the early weeks of life.

Bradshaw believes that genetic changes will need to take place before cats truly find their place in human society. Although there is no single set of genes which will insure that cats transition to a completely harmonious relationship with humans, Bradshaw thinks that it would be more desirable to breed for personality and temperament than for appearance. As a scientist and avid cat-lover, he worries about their future if people misunderstand their actions and intentions. He closes the book with an appeal to all of us, “Cats need our understanding – both as individual animals that need our help to adjust to our ever-increasing demands, and also as a species that is still in transition between the wild and the truly domestic. If we can agree to support them in both these ways, cats will be assured a future in which they are not only popular and populous, but are also more relaxed, and affectionate, than they are today.”

Published by Basic Books, a Member of the Perseus Books Group, New York 2013

FREE ADULT CAT ADOPTIONS IN DECEMBER

The Humane Society of Boulder Valley has a special offer for cat lovers this month:  adoption fees for cats (age 6 months and older) will be waived for the entire month of December!

Please check their website or stop by to pick out the perfect kitty!  Milton, a Siamese Mix whom we featured in our December newsletter, is still available, along with many other beautiful cats.

OPEN FOR ADOPTIONS 7 DAYS A WEEK
Visit boulderhumane.org/adoptcats to see the cats!  Cats are located at the main adoption center, and Westminster PetSmart.

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All Adoptions are Satisfaction Guaranteed!

New treats Introduced

Press release:  November 12, 2013

Boulder Dog Food Company LLC

Introduces New Dog Treats

Made in Boulder, Colorado

 

Summary: Boulder Dog Food Company LLC, a Boulder, Colorado manufacturer of premium dog and cat treats, has introduced several new products in recent months.

(Boulder, CO November 12, 2013) —- Representatives of Boulder Dog Food Company LLC announced today they have been steadily increasing the number of products which they bake in their Boulder bakery, following an expansion of the bakery by more than 80% since the beginning of the year.  New products include more choices of Baked Bison Tendons – the company now offers three types of tendons:  the flexor, the Achilles and the tibial.

“These tendons, naturally low in fat, are easy to digest and help keep teeth and gums clean,” said Ed Withers, Manager of Boulder Dog Food Company.  “Our tendons are healthier and safer alternatives to rawhide or synthetic chews,” he added.

In addition to the tendons, the company has expanded its selection of Baked Bison Bones to include Split Shins where the marrow is more easily accessible for dogs.  The Whole Shin, a large dense bison shin bone, or the Split Shin, are the ideal choices for aggressive chewers. “The bones are slow roasted in their own juices to a deep golden brown color and dogs really love them,” claimed Withers.  There are no added colors, flavors or preservatives.

Withers stressed that Boulder Dog Food Company, which specializes in treats that are single ingredient – meat or poultry or seafood – is committed to sourcing raw product only from free-range ranchers or farmers where the animals have been raised humanely without added hormones or antibiotics.

The company makes all natural and organic beef products and has expanded the number of canine treats available in both categories.  Grass-fed cattle, bison and lambs produce leaner, healthier cuts of meat with more favorable ratios of omega-3 fatty acids. Meat from grass-fed animals also has lower levels of dietary cholesterol and higher levels of antioxidants, including vitamins A and E.

“Unlike most small independent companies that sell dog and cat food or treats, we make all our products in-house.  Many of our competitors buy their products from third party manufacturers, which means that they have no control over the quality or safety of their products. Whereas we select all our meat, poultry and seafood from the best suppliers so we start out by knowing exactly where our raw product is coming from.  Everything is prepared, baked and packaged in our own bakery where we can guarantee the quality and freshness.  Our products are then shipped directly from the bakery rather than sitting for months in a warm warehouse where problems can easily develop with a perishable food item,” explained Withers.

The company, which has a five-star review rating on Amazon.com, says its treats are much higher quality than most other dog and cat treats.  “Given the many recalls from food and treats pet treats made here as well as from foreign countries such as China, it is more important than ever to know who is responsible for each step of production.  We believe that having control over every facet of the process, from the source to the final package, is the only way to make this guarantee,” said Withers.

For more information, please visit: boulderdogfoodcompany.com/all-natural/ and boulderdogfoodcompany.com/blog/

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About Boulder Dog Food Company LLC

The business was started in Boulder, Colorado in 2004.  Their mission is to provide the highest quality gourmet dog and cat treats available using human grade meat and all natural ingredients. They specialize in dog and cat treats that are grain free and 100% meat – bison, beef, lamb, chicken, turkey or 100% fish – tilapia, squid, shrimp, bonito.

So drop by http://www.boulderdogfoodcompany.com/ and be sure to check out the monthly special offers too.

Contact Details:

Ed Withers

303-449-2540

Source: Boulder Dog Food Company LLC

 

Press Release

(Boulder, CO., Oct. 7, 2013) —- Representatives of Boulder Dog Food Company LLC announced today they have increased the square footage of their Boulder bakery by more than 80% since the beginning of the year.  In addition to an overall renovation and reorganization of the bakery’s operations, the company has installed new, more efficient lighting fixtures throughout the building to achieve a significant reduction in annual electricity consumption.  “The bakery has also installed a custom built freezer which allows product to be delivered or picked up by forklifts, a larger sealed “drying” room, and a new HVAC system among other upgrades.  Further plans call for improved efficiency from more automation in the packaging operations, “ said Ed Withers, co-owner of Boulder Dog Food Company LLC.  ”Thanks to the ingenuity of our workers, we have designed some of our own equipment to facilitate the baking process and improve the efficiency of our operation,” he added.

“Unlike most small independent companies which sell dog and cat food or treats, we make all our products in-house.  Many of our competitors buy their products from 3rd party manufacturers which means that they have no control over the quality or safety of their products.  We have selected our meat, poultry and seafood from the best suppliers so we start out by knowing exactly where our raw product is coming from.  Everything is prepared, baked and packaged in our own bakery where we can guarantee the quality and freshness.  Our products are then shipped directly from the bakery rather than sitting for months in a warm warehouse where problems can easily develop with a perishable food item,” explained Withers.

Salmonella, illegal drug residues, and, in some cases, an abhorrent treatment of animals, are just some of the problems that arise from food and treats sourced or made abroad.

“Given the many recalls from food and treats pet treats made here as well as from foreign countries such as China, it is more important than ever to know who is responsible for each step of production.  We believe that having control over every facet of the process, from the source to the final package, is the only way to make this guarantee,” said Withers.

Withers stressed that Boulder Dog Food Company, which specializes in treats that are single ingredient – meat or poultry or seafood, is committed to pursuing environmentally friendly practices throughout its business.

“All organic plant and animal material, including meat scraps, are composted,” Withers pointed out, before adding, “Orders are shipped in recycled and or reused cardboard boxes whenever possible. We use recycled paper for packing material, and we use a custom waste water filtration system.”

The company, which has a five-star review rating on Amazon.com, says its treats are much higher quality than most other dog and cat treats.  “We specialize in treats that are 100 percent meat: grass-fed bison and lamb, organic beef, cage free chicken and turkey or 100 percent fish: organic tilapia, squid, shrimp, bonito,” Withers said.  The animals are raised humanely without steroids, antibiotics or added hormones.

For more information, please visit: http://www.boulderdogfoodcompany.com/all-natural-ingredients/ and http://www.boulderdogfoodcompany.com/blog/

Customer Comments

To BDFC:
Hi there!
 I just wanted to drop a quick note to let you know how much I love your products. My dogs and my client dogs absolutely love everything. I also wanted to thank  you for remembering the small businesses like me that don’t have the option to get products that come through big distribution centers. Those big trucks won’t go down my street. I am so happy that I am able to get your products to provide for my clients. When I have a new client that wants to feed better food and treats, Boulder Dog Food treats are the first thing I tell them about :)
Thank you again!
Leslie
_______________________________________
Dear Leslie,
Thank you for your note.  We never tire of hearing favorable comments about our treats.  On behalf of the entire bakery staff, thanks for helping to spread the word!
Our policy is to post all comments and letters (both good and bad) on our blog and website (using just your first name).  We hope you have no objections.
Kind regards,
Ed
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